Illinois Supreme Court Commission on Professionalism

Illinois Supreme Court Commission on Professionalism Blogs

Latest from Illinois Supreme Court Commission on Professionalism

The Illinois Supreme Court Commission on Professionalism is pleased to announce that Deputy Director Stephanie Villinski has been appointed to the American Bar Association’s Cornerstones of Democracy: Civics, Civility and Collaboration Commission (Commission). Villinski was appointed by ABA President-Elect Deborah Enix-Ross. Her one-year term will commence alongside the 2022 ABA Annual Meeting, which will be

Illinois attorneys with last names beginning A–M, your time is almost up! Submit your compliance with CLE requirements to the MCLE Board by 11:59 p.m. CDT on June 30 to avoid late fees.
The MCLE requirements for the 2020-2022 reporting period are 30 hours of approved Illinois MCLE credit, including at least six professional responsibility

Where does the time go? Lawyers often aren’t productive as they want to be thanks to unexpected distractions that interrupt time planned for client service.
For years, Clio’s Legal Trends Report has analyzed low utilization rates in the legal profession, i.e., how much time attorneys devote to billable work, measured on a per-lawyer basis. In

The Illinois Supreme Court Commission on Professionalism is pleased to announce that the Illinois Supreme Court has appointed Heather Kroencke to the Commission on Professionalism. Kroencke is an attorney based in Lake in the Hills, Ill.
“I am delighted to welcome Heather to the Commission,” said Martin Sinclair, Chair of the Commission on Professionalism. “Heather

Two grants with the goal of improving court processes for self-represented litigants (SRLs) are now open for applications. The grants are available through the Illinois Supreme Court Commission on Access to Justice (ATJ Commission) and the Administrative Office of the Illinois Courts.
Applications for both grants are open now through June 21, 2022.
Online

Put yourself in this scenario: You’re attending a work event one evening when your colleague Martin approaches you and begins to make small talk.
“Hi Janice, how are you doing? I haven’t seen you in a while. In fact, I think the last time we saw each other you were talking about how client expectations

When I joined the Illinois Supreme Court Commission on Professionalism as Deputy Director in 2006, I thought I’d be here for a year or maybe two, until I got my footing and moved on to something else.
See, prior to the Commission on Professionalism, I had left the grueling demands of trial practice to work